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  #1  
Old 12-28-2009
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Default NMDA receptors

I don't like NMDA receptors, I get seriously irritated when I see them in a question, so if anybody knows any high yield information other than these about them, please share.

- Ketotifen and PCP are NMDA antagonists, both were essentially anaesthetic agents, PCP is now only abused with Marijwana.
- Neurotransmitter is Glutamate, with the help of glycin
- They are CNS stimulants
- Blockade prevents tolerance to opioids.
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Old 12-29-2009
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here's what I think is HY:
1. the NMDA receptor if found throughout the CNS (eg.hippocampus, cerebral cortex, spinal cord)

2. when glutamate n the cofactor glycine bind to the NMDA receptor the gate is opened and influx of Na n Ca and efflux of K occurs.

3. in addition, a voltage dependent membrane depolarization is required to open the gate bcz the NMDA receptor is "plugged" by extracellular Mg at resting membrane potential.

4. drugs, Amantidine (noncompetitive blocker)

Memantine (noncompetitive, use-Dependant blocker)

Ketamine (Ketalar, special K, k) is an antagoinist that acts as a CNS depressent & dissociative anesthetic, date rape drug.

PCP n Dizocilpne are NMDA receptor open channel blockers.

Will add your points as well.
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Old 12-29-2009
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Question

This is realy helpful. But what do you mean by (NMDA receptor open channel blockers), does it mean they only act on stimulated NMDA receptors ? Also in memantine (use dependant blocker)?
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Old 12-29-2009
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open channel blockers- requires the NMDA receptor to be open to be able to gain access to their binding sites.

use dependent- it becomes an effective antagoinist only after repeated receptor activation and channel opening.
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Old 12-29-2009
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emmm...

the anti-epileptic drug FELBAMATE acts on NMDA receptors and causes its inhibition...

whereas the drug TOPIRAMATE, acts on non- NMDA (AMPA receptors ).... topiramate is also a Na channel blocker and a Gaba channel agonist....
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Old 12-29-2009
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Plz I want to know relation beteen NMDA receptors and Glycine
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Old 12-29-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tomymajor View Post
Plz I want to know relation beteen NMDA receptors and Glycine
I think it is NMDA antagonist???
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Old 12-29-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tomymajor View Post
Plz I want to know relation beteen NMDA receptors and Glycine
It's been mentioned, it's a cofactor for the stimulator glutamate
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Old 01-02-2010
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some other important points I came across:

1. The NMDA receptor is important clinically bcz its hyperactivity causes excessive influx of Ca ions, this is known as glutamate toxicity, especially in the caudate nucleus leading to cell death and is implicated in Huntington disease.

2. this receptor is involved in the learning process through longterm potentiation in the hippocampus.
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Old 12-06-2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ahassan View Post
some other important points I came across:

1. The NMDA receptor is important clinically bcz its hyperactivity causes excessive influx of Ca ions, this is known as glutamate toxicity, especially in the caudate nucleus leading to cell death and is implicated in Huntington disease.

2. this receptor is involved in the learning process through longterm potentiation in the hippocampus.

some where is also mention that valproic acid blocks the NMDA receptors and thereby affecting the potassium current
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