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Old 03-26-2012
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Question Exercise and body temperature

Can somebody explain to me why our body temperature increases during exercise ?

Exercising muscles vasodilate due to epinephrine acting on beta 2 receptors. Alpha adrenergic receptors become less responsive to NE and cause no vasoconstrictive effect on exercising muscle. And in Kaplan it says that when you vasodilate, you sweat which is a heat dissipating mechanism so your body temperature actually decreases. I'm confused because how is that exercising muscles vasodilate and still increase the body temperature? Did I miss something here ... Thanks.
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Default metabolism

what about body metabolism? it's increasing in exercise and this will cause an increase in temperature
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Its the cutaneous vessels which when vasodilate, help dissipate the heat.
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Ah right, that was a stupid question lol I didn't think about metabolism and the fact that these are cutaneous vessels that regulate the body temperature. Increased metabolism = increased demand for O2 = increased ATP used and more energy in the form of heat is given off. Thanks it makes sense!
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Ah right, that was a stupid question lol I didn't think about metabolism and the fact that these are cutaneous vessels that regulate the body temperature. Increased metabolism = increased demand for O2 = increased ATP used and more energy in the form of heat is given off. Thanks it makes sense!
Also i think that you should think about lactic acid during exercise, which is the most important factor for vasodilation during exercise ( during exercise the muscles are controlled by intrinsic factors such as lactic acid)
good luck..
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Originally Posted by Hope2Pass View Post
Can somebody explain to me why our body temperature increases during exercise ?

Exercising muscles vasodilate due to epinephrine acting on beta 2 receptors. Alpha adrenergic receptors become less responsive to NE and cause no vasoconstrictive effect on exercising muscle. And in Kaplan it says that when you vasodilate, you sweat which is a heat dissipating mechanism so your body temperature actually decreases. I'm confused because how is that exercising muscles vasodilate and still increase the body temperature? Did I miss something here ... Thanks.
Thats going to molecular level. When you exercise, you enhance different pathways in order to produce ATP. Most of ATP is produce at the mitochondria in the ETC and the energy that is released is:
For each NADH + O2 ------ Delta G = -56kcal
For each FADH + O2 ------ Delta G = - 42 kcal.

Thats for EACH, NADH or FADH, in normal metabolism. Now if you increase it during exercise... your T is going up followed by everything you said. I need to do my jogging. jejeje!!!
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Originally Posted by johnvega98 View Post
Thats going to molecular level. When you exercise, you enhance different pathways in order to produce ATP. Most of ATP is produce at the mitochondria in the ETC and the energy that is released is:
For each NADH + O2 ------ Delta G = -56kcal
For each FADH + O2 ------ Delta G = - 42 kcal.

Thats for EACH, NADH or FADH, in normal metabolism. Now if you increase it during exercise... your T is going up followed by everything you said. I need to do my jogging. jejeje!!!
Haha don't we all!
Thanks for the explanation. It makes a lot of sense now. I just confused myself with the vasodilaton between the cutaneous vessels etc.
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Haha don't we all!
Thanks for the explanation. It makes a lot of sense now. I just confused myself with the vasodilaton between the cutaneous vessels etc.
LOL! yeah! cose this studying thing is making me sweat without burning some fat!!!
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