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Old 05-28-2013
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Blood Platelet consumption and bleeding

Hello!
i wanted to know why does platelet consumption result in bleeding? as in DIC for example?

Last edited by glory; 05-28-2013 at 10:21 AM.
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Old 05-28-2013
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so no answer after 21 views by genius guys
come on:sorry:
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Old 05-28-2013
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Quote:
Originally Posted by glory View Post
Hello!
i wanted to know why does platelet consumption result in bleeding? as in DIC for example?
Platelets form the initial hemostatic plug that controls bleeding temporarily, until clotting factors get activated. In DIC, all the platelets and clotting factors are used up, hence resulting in excessive uncontrolled bleeding. Read up on this from goljan or physio for a complete understanding.
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Platelets form the initial hemostatic plug that controls bleeding temporarily, until clotting factors get activated. In DIC, all the platelets and clotting factors are used up, hence resulting in excessive uncontrolled bleeding. Read up on this from goljan or physio for a complete understanding.
since all the platelets are used up so why wouldn't the ptnt develop obstruction for example! why bleeding? does the text mean bleeding upon trauma or what? thanks!
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Old 05-28-2013
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DIC is a form of consumptive coagulopathy, meaning you use up so many of your platelets that you end up with a low platelet count (they are all bundled together in various places and you have less floating freely in the serum during the acute phase)

The patient bleeds and clots in various sites of the body. There is an imbalance. Some parts where there is intrinsic endothelial injury is more likely to develop clots, but recall that with sepsis and DIC, other parts of the body are also leaky and will bleed easily!!!

You were thinking of obstruction such as the full thrombus seen in unstable angina right? This does happen. you get clots in important organs such as the renal vessels and the organ ischemia is the main reason why DIC is a medical emergency.

These mini clots scattered throughout the body use up your immediately platelet pool you have available and thus your platelet count goes down until more can be formed by megakaryocytes. Thus you have a functional platelet deficiency and will present with symptoms similar to patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and etc i.e. ecchymoses, mucosal bleeding
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initial plug is formed by platelet also vwf helps so in dic both fibrinlytic and throbotic pathways are activited thats y u get d dimers and there will b no obstruction
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