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Old 12-24-2010
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Heart The difference between Foramen Ovale and Ostium Secondum

Would a patent foramen ovale defect be the same as a foramen secundum defect? Which is more serious - a resorption of the septum primum or the septum secundum?
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Foramen ovale is the passageway through both septums while ostium secondum is the hole formed within the septum secondum.
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Old 12-24-2010
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Default re: foramen ovale

So a foramen ovale defect would be more serious, as it involves both septums; a foramen secundum defect can generally be considered a foramen ovale defect as well, correct?
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Default Foramen Ovale and Ostium Secundum are not the same

Quote:
Originally Posted by schiwei View Post
So a foramen ovale defect would be more serious, as it involves both septums; a foramen secundum defect can generally be considered a foramen ovale defect as well, correct?
No Foramen Ovale is present in every one of us. It's just closed by the higher left atrium pressure. So anatomically we all have it, it's closed functionally.
Ostium secundum on the other hand might get so defective (for example Down syndrome patients) that even with left atrial pressure pressing the septum primum against the septum secundum you still get a defect through which blood can pass and therefore it needs repair.
So a persistent ostium secondum is far more serious than a patent foramen ovale.
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Thumbs Up re: patent foramen ovale

thanks, that clears it right up!
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Old 12-24-2010
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thankssssssssssssssssss
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Old 02-08-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sabio View Post
No Foramen Ovale is present in every one of us. It's just closed by the higher left atrium pressure. So anatomically we all have it, it's closed functionally.
Ostium secundum on the other hand might get so defective (for example Down syndrome patients) that even with left atrial pressure pressing the septum primum against the septum secundum you still get a defect through which blood can pass and therefore it needs repair.
So a persistent ostium secondum is far more serious than a patent foramen ovale.
I thought that in adults normally the foramen ovale is closed and has become the fossa ovalis (thats why in some cases of catheter ablation of arrhythmias we must puncture the fossa ovale to get into the left atrium. Only in some individuals it remains patent but clinically silent because of the pressure exerted on septum primum by the left ventricle ("functionally closed"). Is that wrong?
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adorisz View Post
I thought that in adults normally the foramen ovale is closed and has become the fossa ovalis (thats why in some cases of catheter ablation of arrhythmias we must puncture the fossa ovale to get into the left atrium. Only in some individuals it remains patent but clinically silent because of the pressure exerted on septum primum by the left ventricle ("functionally closed"). Is that wrong?
No, that's not wrong, what you said is correct and it does not conflict with what I said before.
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Old 05-13-2011
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Thank you Sabio, That's great explanation
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Old 05-13-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sabio View Post
Foramen ovale is the passageway through both septums while ostium secondum is the hole formed within the septum secondum.
Foramen secundum is still in the septum primum. the foramen primum is closed when the septum primum fuses with the endocardial cushion. But before that, an apoptotic process make another foramen (secondum) in a more superior position of the same (primum) septum to keep the flow from right to left atrium.
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