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Old 04-18-2011
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Drug Pharmacologic intervention for alcoholism

A 46-year-old woman with chronic alcoholism has recently undergone detoxification and has abstained from alcoholic beverages for several weeks. She has joined a “twelve-step” program and seeks assistance from her physician in helping maintain sobriety. Her physician prescribes an agent that is a structural analogue of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). By which mechanism does this agent help maintain abstinence from alcohol?

A. Accelerating ethanol catabolism
B. Augmenting dopaminergic activity in the nucleus accumbens
C. Blocking the effects of endorphins that reinforce the use of ethanol
D. Producing distressing symptoms when ethanol is ingested
E. Restoring the balance between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission
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D

When alcohol is consumed it is metabolized by the body into acetaldehyde, a very toxic substance that causes many hangover symptoms heavy drinkers experience. Usually, the body continues to oxidize acetaldehyde into acetic acid, which is harmless.
Antabuse interferes with this metabolic process, stops the process with the production of acetaldehyde and prevents the oxidation of acetaldehyde into acetic acid. Because of this, antabuse will cause a build up of acetaldehyde five or 10 times greater than normally occurs when someone drinks alcohol.

http://alcoholism.about.com/od/meds/a/antabuse.htm
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Originally Posted by 1TA2B View Post
D

When alcohol is consumed it is metabolized by the body into acetaldehyde, a very toxic substance that causes many hangover symptoms heavy drinkers experience. Usually, the body continues to oxidize acetaldehyde into acetic acid, which is harmless.
Antabuse interferes with this metabolic process, stops the process with the production of acetaldehyde and prevents the oxidation of acetaldehyde into acetic acid. Because of this, antabuse will cause a build up of acetaldehyde five or 10 times greater than normally occurs when someone drinks alcohol.

http://alcoholism.about.com/od/meds/a/antabuse.htm
You did a great job in explaining the effect of disulfiram. However, it's not the drug decribed in this question stem.
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Show Teeth hey

Acamprosate which is the drug in here, his mechansim is Restoring the balance between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission
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I would go with E

Although I don't know the name of the drug that is described, I would guess that the drug is used to prevent symptoms of alcohol withdrawal by balancing out excitatory and inhibitory NT's.
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I would go with E

Although I don't know the name of the drug that is described, I would guess that the drug is used to prevent symptoms of alcohol withdrawal by balancing out excitatory and inhibitory NT's.
Yes, also E...is the only one related with the GABA pathway
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Acamprosate which is the drug in here, his mechansim is Restoring the balance between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission
a good mnemonic:
Pharmacologic Rx For Alcohalics!
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Yup, you guys are doing great job, the correct answer is E and the drugs is acamprosate.
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Old 04-22-2011
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You did a great job in explaining the effect of disulfiram. However, it's not the drug decribed in this question stem.
Ooooooops!
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