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Old 05-25-2011
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Question Concentric vs Eccentric hypertrophy?

What's the difference between concentric and eccentric hypertrophy. I only know that eccentric is in response to volume overload and causes the addition of sarcomeres in series, thus enlarging radius in proportion to the wall thickness. And in concentric hypertrophy, the stress is a pressure overload and it adds sarcomeres in parallel thus reducing the radius. But I somehow don't get the concept. Why is there a difference between the manifestations of volume and pressure overload?
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Old 05-26-2011
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Originally Posted by eesfee View Post
What's the difference between concentric and eccentric hypertrophy. I only know that eccentric is in response to volume overload and causes the addition of sarcomeres in series, thus enlarging radius in proportion to the wall thickness. And in concentric hypertrophy, the stress is a pressure overload and it adds sarcomeres in parallel thus reducing the radius. But I somehow don't get the concept. Why is there a difference between the manifestations of volume and pressure overload?
I think this perfectly explains it:

Quote:
If the precipitating stress is volume overload (as through aerobic exercise, which increases blood return to the heart through the action of the skeletal muscle pump, the ventricle responds by adding new sarcomeres in-series with existing sarcomeres (i.e. the sarcomeres lengthen rather than thicken). This results in ventricular dilation while maintaining normal sarcomere lengths - the heart can expand to receive a greater volume of blood. The wall thickness normally increases in proportion to the increase in chamber radius. This type of hypertrophy is termed eccentric hypertrophy


In the case of chronic pressure overload (as through anaerobic exercise, which increases resistance to blood flow by compressing arteries), the chamber radius may not change; however, the wall thickness greatly increases as new sarcomeres are added in-parallel to existing sarcomeres.



This is termed concentric hypertrophy. This type of ventricle is capable of generating greater forces and higher pressures, while the increased wall thickness maintains normal wall stress. This type of ventricle becomes "stiff" (i.e., compliance is reduced) which can impair filling and lead to diastolic dysfunction.
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Old 05-26-2011
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Thanks. Can you please tell me WHY volume stress adds sarcomere in series and pressure stress adds sarcomere in parallel?
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Old 05-26-2011
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Originally Posted by eesfee View Post
Thanks. Can you please tell me WHY volume stress adds sarcomere in series and pressure stress adds sarcomere in parallel?
I could, but there's no point since its really not HY.

Save your memory for those annoying little details like CD markers in immunology
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Old 05-26-2011
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Haha okay Thanks dude.
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