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Old 06-08-2011
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Question Alcohol addiction neurotransmitter?

what chemical neurotransmitter most common in alcohol addiction ?


dopamin or glutamate
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Old 06-09-2011
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8 KEY NEUROTRANSMITTERS

1- Serotonin (an inhibitory neurotransmitter that exerts a soothing influence on unpleasant emotions and prevents us from overactions.)

2- GABA (inhibits, similar to serotonin, and that helps alleviate anxiety and worry and influences intellectual activity.)

3- Endorphins and Enkephalins (two groups of structurally similar inhibitory transmitters that are powerful natural pain relievers.)

4- Endocannabinoids (acts as a modulatory system, fine-tuning the body’s responses to a variety of stimuli)

5- Acetylcholine (inhibits dopamine’s potential for unrestrained delusional, paranoid content)

6- Dopamine (known as the “euphoria” neurotransmitter.)

7- Taurine (inhibits similar to GABA)

8- Histamine (regulates alertness and wake-sleep cycles)

Substance abuse is thus caused by replacing one or more of the key neurotransmitters with an artificial chemical such as alcohol, cocaine or valium, to temporarily satisfy a craving.

The more that a psychotropic artificial substance is used, the more the neurotransmitters which the chemical is mimicking are depleted, and increasingly larger amounts of the addictive chemical must be used to achieve the same stress reduction effect (tolerance). The condition worsens as the natural transmitter is depleted. The addict is compelled by their biochemical imbalances to seek the object of their craving at any cost, even if it jeopardizes their health, personal relationships, and job



http://www.addictionsolutionsource.c...auses-and-cure
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Old 06-09-2011
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Default Acamprosate

Thank you both for posting an important area and we know little.

Yes. I also found that mesolimbic dopamine pathway plays an important role in mediating the behavioural effects of alcohol that have been linked to its abuse and dependence. However multiple neurotransmitters (serotonergic, glutamatergic, GABAergic and opioid systems) are involved!

Next area we should discuss is pharmacotherapy for alcohol abuse!

Acamprosate is the drug of choice for the treatment of alcoholism in Europe. It is a structural analogue of the neurotransmitter GABA, which is reported to exert its effects mainly via an interaction with the NMDA (
N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. NMDA receptor is one of the specific receptors located within the brain reward pathway to which alcohol directly binds, and it can indirectly modulate mesolimbic dopamine activity. This is relevant to alcoholism because hyperexcitability in the NMDA system has been shown to occur following long-term alcohol use and has been linked with the expression of withdrawal on cessation of drinking. Clinical testing of the efficacy of acamprosate in the treatment of alcoholism has been extensive.The outcomes of these studies have consistently demonstrated that the use of acamprosate significantly improves abstinence rates and reduces the number of relapses.

http://www.cmaj.ca/cgi/content/full/164/6/817
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Old 06-09-2011
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thanks for great explanation

i asked one of my friends he told me that Glutamate +NMDA responsible for euphoria and addiction in alcohol

but from step one study i told him its dopamine system .

so what should i choose for this ?

A-Dopamine

B-glutamate
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Old 06-15-2011
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what i should choose ?
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Old 06-15-2011
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Neurotransmitter systems don't work in isolation!

GABA is main inhibitory transmitter and glutamate is excitatory.

If I have to choose between the two you mentioned, I would go with glutamate!
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SO YOU MEAN THAT GLUTAMATE RESPONSIBLE FOR ALCOHOL ADDICTION??

not dopamin
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1TA2B View Post
Thank you both for posting an important area and we know little.

Yes. I also found that mesolimbic dopamine pathway plays an important role in mediating the behavioural effects of alcohol that have been linked to its abuse and dependence. However multiple neurotransmitters (serotonergic, glutamatergic, GABAergic and opioid systems) are involved!

Next area we should discuss is pharmacotherapy for alcohol abuse!

Acamprosate is the drug of choice for the treatment of alcoholism in Europe. It is a structural analogue of the neurotransmitter GABA, which is reported to exert its effects mainly via an interaction with the NMDA (
N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. NMDA receptor is one of the specific receptors located within the brain reward pathway to which alcohol directly binds, and it can indirectly modulate mesolimbic dopamine activity. This is relevant to alcoholism because hyperexcitability in the NMDA system has been shown to occur following long-term alcohol use and has been linked with the expression of withdrawal on cessation of drinking. Clinical testing of the efficacy of acamprosate in the treatment of alcoholism has been extensive.The outcomes of these studies have consistently demonstrated that the use of acamprosate significantly improves abstinence rates and reduces the number of relapses.

http://www.cmaj.ca/cgi/content/full/164/6/817


from this explanation i thought dopamine is the answer ?

thanks for your great effort and useful posts
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Old 09-14-2012
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Nice thread and the discussion was great. I love to read this information.Its nice.
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