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Old 05-20-2012
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Question androgen insensitvity syndrome vs testicular regression syndrome

Hi...
Can anyone please EXPLAIN difference between testicular feminization syndrome (androgen insensitvity syndrome) and testicular regression syndrome??
Thank you
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Old 05-24-2012
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in testicular feminisation syndrome u have defective testosterone receptors which do not respond to normal amount of testosterone

while

in testicular regression syndrome , testes r absent at birth so low testosterone......

I myself don't remember much so
may be these links help u

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anorchia

and

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Androge...ivity_syndrome
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Old 06-07-2012
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Thanks ...
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Old 06-07-2012
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androgen insensitvity syndrome>>>> Normal testosterone levels

testicular regression syndrome>>>>> Low testosterone levels
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Old 06-07-2012
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Previously referred to as testicular feminization, this condition is known as complete androgen insensitivity syndrome. It is an X-linked disorder in which the patients are genotypically male (possessing and X and Y chromosome) and phenotypically female. This disorder is rare, with reported incidences from 1 in 20,000 to 1 in 60,000 live male births, and is the result of a missing gene on the X chromosome that is responsible for the cytoplasmic or nuclear testosterone receptor. In its absence, the gonad, which is a testis, produces normal amounts of testosterone; however, the end tissues are unable to respond due to the deficient receptors leading to the external genitalia developing in a female fashion. Anti-mullerian hormone, which is produced by the testis, is normal in these patients, leading to regression of the mullerian duct. Wolffian duct development, which depends on testosterone, does not occur as the ducts lack the receptors. The cumulative effect is a genotypic male with normal external female genitalia (without pubic or axillary hair), no menses, normal breast development, short or absent vagina, no internal sex organs, and the presence of testis. Frequently, these patients have bilateral inguinal hernias in childhood, and their presence should arouse suspicion of the diagnosis.

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/517754
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Old 06-08-2012
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thank you for explain...
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Old 10-25-2015
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Quote:
Originally Posted by swwal View Post
Hi...
Can anyone please EXPLAIN difference between testicular feminization syndrome () and testicular regression syndrome??
Thank you
Individuals with testicular regression syndrome have karyotype 46, XY, absent testes and a variable degree of differentiation of the genital tract, urogenital sinus and the external genitalia. If the testicular regression occurs before 8 weeks of embryonic life, the individual has female genitalia and sexual infantilism. In them, testicular regression. occurs after development of Sertoli cells that produce AMH and regresses the Müllerian duct, and before the start of the function of the Leydig cells, so it is not developed duct Wolff . These patients differ from pure gonadal dysgenesis 46, XY by the absence of gonads and structures müllerians.

Complete androgen insensitivity sd. is a pseudohermaphroditism, It is pseudohermaphroditism where testicular androgen receptors do not work, so there is no complete sexual development.

A person with complete insensitivity syndrome Androgen appears to be female but has no uterus, and has very little armpit and pubic hair. At puberty, female sexual characteristics such as breasts develop; however, the person does not menstruate or become fertile.

People with incomplete insensitivity syndrome androgens may have both male and female physical characteristics. Many have partial closing of the outer lips of the vagina, an enlarged clitoris and a short vagina.

There may be:

Vagina, but no cervix or uterus
Inguinal hernia with a testicle that can be felt during a physical exam
Normal female breast
Testes in the abdomen or other unusual places in the body
Exams and Tests
The syndrome of complete androgen insensitivity is rarely discovered during childhood. Sometimes, you feel a mass in the abdomen or groin that turns out to be a testicle when it is explored surgically. Most people with this condition are not diagnosed until they have menstruation or have difficulty getting pregnant.

However, incomplete syndrome, is often discovered during childhood because the person may have both male and female physical characteristics.

Tests used to diagnose this condition may include:

Blood tests to check levels of testosterone, luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH)
Genetic testing (karyotyping) to determine the genetic makeup of the person
Pelvic ultrasound
They can do other blood tests to help differentiate between the syndrome and androgen insensitivity androgen deficiency.
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