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Old 04-21-2011
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Heart Cardiac output (dyne/sec)

What is the mean of

Cardiac Output = 2000 dyne/sec normal (700 - 1200)??

this mean increased or decreased Cardiac Output
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Old 04-21-2011
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Dyn or Dyne means the force needed to move 1gm in one direction in one second.

In your example it obviously means increased cardiac output
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Old 04-21-2011
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A 67-year-old Caucasian male is hospitalized in the intensive care unit (ICU) with an episode of prolonged hypotension and shortness of breath. His skin is cold and clammy. Intra-arterial blood pressure monitoring is established, and pulmonary artery catheterization is performed to control basic hemodynamic parameters. His blood pressure is 70/40 mmHg, and heart rate is 100/min. Cardiac output (CO) measured by thermodilution method is 2.3 L/min. Pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) is estimated to be 22 mmHg. Systemic vascular resistance (SVR) calculated using data on mean arterial pressure, right atrial pressure and cardiac output is 2000 dynes*s/cm5 (N = 700 - 1200 dynes*s/cm5). Which of the following is the most likely underlying problem in this patient?


A ). Cardiogenic shock
B ). Volume depletion
C ). Septic shock
D ). Volume overload
E ). Right ventricular infarction
F ). Pulmonary artery embolism
G ). Neurogenic shock
H ). Non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema
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Old 04-21-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sarah-cali View Post
Dyn or Dyne means the force needed to move 1gm in one direction in one second.

In your example it obviously means increased cardiac output


thanks ....please answer question above
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Old 04-21-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kemoo1985 View Post
A 67-year-old Caucasian male is hospitalized in the intensive care unit (ICU) with an episode of prolonged hypotension and shortness of breath. His skin is cold and clammy. Intra-arterial blood pressure monitoring is established, and pulmonary artery catheterization is performed to control basic hemodynamic parameters. His blood pressure is 70/40 mmHg, and heart rate is 100/min. Cardiac output (CO) measured by thermodilution method is 2.3 L/min. Pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) is estimated to be 22 mmHg. Systemic vascular resistance (SVR) calculated using data on mean arterial pressure, right atrial pressure and cardiac output is 2000 dynes*s/cm5 (N = 700 - 1200 dynes*s/cm5). Which of the following is the most likely underlying problem in this patient?


A ). Cardiogenic shock
B ). Volume depletion
C ). Septic shock
D ). Volume overload
E ). Right ventricular infarction
F ). Pulmonary artery embolism
G ). Neurogenic shock
H ). Non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema
the SVR is increased not the CO....that should be hypovolemic shock i think because signs are of shock and it is obviously not cardiogenic as CO is normal.. the answer should be volume depletion
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Old 04-21-2011
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normal CO is about 5 lit/min not 2.3, the signs suggest cardiogenic shock
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Old 04-21-2011
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shucks you ARE right....it is 2.5/sq m of body and the body is 1.7 sqm for an average adult....Cardiac index is 2.6 not output...
so it should be cardiogenic shock..
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Old 04-21-2011
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yes thank u... after reading it initially i was sure on volume depletion then i saw the lowered CO and tot no cardiogenic, then i saw increase SVR and i was back at volume depletion.

good discussion though. thx!
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right the answer is A - Cardiogenic shock
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