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rank the programs that liked you

don't rank the best programs u interviewed
rather rank the best programs that liked u
bad luck dear friend
hope u'll make it next year
 

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Wherever you read that you have to rank the programs in the ROL according to what you liked best, is a misdirection. The designers of the matching program want you to be honest with your ranking so that it brings credibility to how the match is made.

This is how the program actually works:
Step 1. Check the Residency Program's ROL, and find which applicant is placed as #1.
Step 2. Check if there is more than one Residency Program that ranked the same applicant as #1.
Step 3. Scan all applicants, and see if they likewise ranked the program as #1.
Step 4. Those that are not matched #1 to #1, go back to the general circulation.
Step 5. Go back to Step 1, and check applicants listed as #2. And repeat the process.

If you do not match in the first step, you go back to the general circulation with all the thousands of other applicants.

Solution:
1. During the interview process make sure that they will like you, and strive to be ranked as high as possible on their ROL.
2. The higher they rank you, the sooner the matching program will get to your name.
3. Consider which Residency Program will rank you the highest, and rank them as #1. And follow the process down the list to the one who will rank you the lowest.
4. DO NOT!!! rank according to which program you like the best.

Imagine, everyone wants to go to Yale. So everyone will rank them as #1? of course the program will only consider only those that Yale will rank the highest on the list.

Remember, the matching program ALWAYS starts with the Residency Program's ROL; and NOT with the applicants.
 

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The above information is FALSE. Please read what I have copied and pasted directly from nrmp.org regarding the Match Algorthm:

The process begins with an attempt to match an applicant to the program most preferred on that applicant's rank order list (ROL). If the applicant cannot be matched to that first choice program, an attempt then is made to place the applicant into the second choice program, and so on, until the applicant obtains a tentative match or all the applicant's choices on the ROL have been exhausted. When all applicant rank order lists have been considered, all tentative matches become final.

ROL TIPS AND REMINDERS FOR APPLICANTS (copy and pasted directly from NRMP)

Do:

Rank programs in order of your TRUE PREFERENCE, not where you think you will match.
Rank only those programs where you would be happy to train. Remember, the Match commitment is binding.
Be realistic about your competiveness and the competiveness of your preferred specialty (click here for Charting Outcomes in the Match). Consider creating a ROL that includes a mix of competitive and less competitive specialties and programs.
Remember that a supplemental rank order list will be used in the Main Residency Match® only if you first match to an advanced program on your primary rank order list. The algorithm will not attempt to match you to a preliminary position on a supplemental ROL if an advanced match on the primary ROL is not obtained.
Make sure your ROL is long enough. Go for your "reach" program but also include at least one "safety" program.
Don't:

Do not wait until the last minute to enter your rank order list in the R3® system. The servers may be overloaded and working very slowly.
Do not make last minute changes to your rank order list. Most such changes are not well thought out and applicants frequently regret the changes.
Do not forget that if a certified ROL is changed in any way, the new version must be certified in order to be used for the Match. The R3 system does NOT save prior versions of ROLs!
Do not forget that changes CANNOT be made after 9:00 p.m. EASTERN time on the rank order list deadline and that only certified lists will be used in a Match.
Do not forget that the NRMP will NOT enter a list, add, delete or move programs or in any way modify a rank order list.
 

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thanks kmb1908. That was a great help. i hate it when people have absolutely no clue what they are talking about and spreading their words on internet.
 

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...
3. Consider which Residency Program will rank you the highest, and rank them as #1. And follow the process down the list to the one who will rank you the lowest.
4. DO NOT!!! rank according to which program you like the best.

Imagine, everyone wants to go to Yale. So everyone will rank them as #1? of course the program will only consider only those that Yale will rank the highest on the list.

Remember, the matching program ALWAYS starts with the Residency Program's ROL; and NOT with the applicants.
This is incorrect. Please do not post such misleading information.

---Lets say Program A is last on your rank list. They have 10 spots. They have ranked you number 10. If you do not get into any of your top choices, a spot in Program A is guaranteed for you since they have ranked you within the number of spots available in that program.

---Ranking a program that you like at the top is to your advantage. If none of your top choices are available, you always have Program A as per the example I just described above.
 

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Interesting response... lets look at the numbers.

2014 NRMP Match results:
61.5% of the US Seniors matched and approximately 38% of the IMG's Matched. That means that only 1 in 3 IMG's will find a program.

Nearly 99% of the Residency spots will be filled. Majority of them by the US Seniors. If a program has 10 spots, you can rest assured that all of them will be filled.

If you start doing research of PGY1's, PGY2's and 3's that matched in previous years, you will find that highly sought after programs are biased towards US Seniors, and those in the middle of the fields or VA programs end up with IMG's.

Now, why would you want to waste the #1 precious spot on your ROL on a program that you know you will NOT match in?

The process that is described above works well for the US Seniors, but not for IMG's where you have only a 1 in 3 chance of matching. You have to be calculating, otherwise the 10 spots will be filled by other IMG's who selected it higher than you.

Think!
 

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Interesting response... lets look at the numbers.

2014 NRMP Match results:
61.5% of the US Seniors matched and approximately 38% of the IMG's Matched. That means that only 1 in 3 IMG's will find a program.

Nearly 99% of the Residency spots will be filled. Majority of them by the US Seniors. If a program has 10 spots, you can rest assured that all of them will be filled.

If you start doing research of PGY1's, PGY2's and 3's that matched in previous years, you will find that highly sought after programs are biased towards US Seniors, and those in the middle of the fields or VA programs end up with IMG's.

Now, why would you want to waste the #1 precious spot on your ROL on a program that you know you will NOT match in?

The process that is described above works well for the US Seniors, but not for IMG's where you have only a 1 in 3 chance of matching. You have to be calculating, otherwise the 10 spots will be filled by other IMG's who selected it higher than you.

Think!
You sound clueless.
 

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Interesting response... lets look at the numbers.

2014 NRMP Match results:
61.5% of the US Seniors matched and approximately 38% of the IMG's Matched. That means that only 1 in 3 IMG's will find a program.

Nearly 99% of the Residency spots will be filled. Majority of them by the US Seniors. If a program has 10 spots, you can rest assured that all of them will be filled.

If you start doing research of PGY1's, PGY2's and 3's that matched in previous years, you will find that highly sought after programs are biased towards US Seniors, and those in the middle of the fields or VA programs end up with IMG's.

Now, why would you want to waste the #1 precious spot on your ROL on a program that you know you will NOT match in?

The process that is described above works well for the US Seniors, but not for IMG's where you have only a 1 in 3 chance of matching. You have to be calculating, otherwise the 10 spots will be filled by other IMG's who selected it higher than you.

Think!
wow dumb :sleepy:
 

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Wherever you read that you have to rank the programs in the ROL according to what you liked best, is a misdirection. The designers of the matching program want you to be honest with your ranking so that it brings credibility to how the match is made.

This is how the program actually works:
Step 1. Check the Residency Program's ROL, and find which applicant is placed as #1.
Step 2. Check if there is more than one Residency Program that ranked the same applicant as #1.
Step 3. Scan all applicants, and see if they likewise ranked the program as #1.
Step 4. Those that are not matched #1 to #1, go back to the general circulation.
Step 5. Go back to Step 1, and check applicants listed as #2. And repeat the process.

If you do not match in the first step, you go back to the general circulation with all the thousands of other applicants.

Solution:
1. During the interview process make sure that they will like you, and strive to be ranked as high as possible on their ROL.
2. The higher they rank you, the sooner the matching program will get to your name.
3. Consider which Residency Program will rank you the highest, and rank them as #1. And follow the process down the list to the one who will rank you the lowest.
4. DO NOT!!! rank according to which program you like the best.

Imagine, everyone wants to go to Yale. So everyone will rank them as #1? of course the program will only consider only those that Yale will rank the highest on the list.

Remember, the matching program ALWAYS starts with the Residency Program's ROL; and NOT with the applicants.
Actually, it makes sense.

We have a habit of "following what the book says". Sometimes, we need to think and plan our strategies on our own, by interpreting the trends. It's called smartness.
 
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