USMLE Forums banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A 32 yr old man comes for weakness and blurred vision. He states that these symptoms become progressively worse throughout the day and improve with rest. On examination ptosis and weakness of limb muscles seen on repetitive testing. If pharmacotherapy is indicated, the most appropriate treatment is a drug with which of the following mechanisms ??
A. Carbamylation of Acetylcholinesterase
B. Dephosphorylation of Acetylcholinesterase
C. Direct muscarinic receptor agonist
D. Direct muscarinic receptor antagonist
E. Direct nicotinic recpetor agonist
F. Phosphorylation of Acetylcholinesterase

Reasoning must with ans. :)
 

· Registered
Joined
·
91 Posts
I'll say it's A. Carbamylation of Acetylcholinesterase.
Most reversible acetylcholinesterase inhibitors are carbamates (remember insecticides).
I know organophosphorates irreversible phosphorylate acetylcholinesterase, so it's not F, and that for me, would also discard B dephosphorylation.

Veeery nice question indeed. Please correct me if i'm wrong with full explanations.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'll say it's A. Carbamylation of Acetylcholinesterase.
Most reversible acetylcholinesterase inhibitors are carbamates (remember insecticides).
I know organophosphorates irreversible phosphorylate acetylcholinesterase, so it's not F, and that for me, would also discard B dephosphorylation.

Veeery nice question indeed. Please correct me if i'm wrong with full explanations.
You re right. This is a case of myasthenia gravis. Two of them most common drugs used in this are neostigmine and pyridostigmine ( carbamates ) both of which act by carbamylating the acetylcholinesterase enzyme.
In severe cases of MG the above drugs are combined with prednisone.
I hope its clear enough.
Good Luck !! :happy:
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top