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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hi everyone,
i have a question for u guys.
i was wandering about the huge residency admission fees.

when an IMG gets matched and have J1 visa, he is not an immigrant, right?
so, how the IMGs solve the huge admission fees problem?
they can have scholarship but do all the school provide scholarship?
can they get student loan?

as far as i know, IMGs need around 40-50,000 US dollar per year, right?
and if the course is for 3yrs, the fees r around $150,000.
if u r not an immigrant or citizen, bank does not give u student loan - am i right?
and it's not possible to arrange such amount just by doing part time job.
so how do they arrange the money?
if some how IMGs can get loan, usually how long does that takes?
when they can apply? etc. etc.

thanks in advance to everyone who replies to this thread.
 

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Dear redroses,

There's no admission fees when you are matched in residency, whether you are American citizen, immigrant, or J1 Visa.

The numbers you mentioned 40K to 50K, these are your salary range in the first year of residency also called PGY1.

You don't need a student loan.

You will be making money :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
so, r u saying that we have to pay nothing?
and the course is free of cost?
a 3/4 yrs course?

and i don't need student loan?
i just have to bear my personal expenses?
 

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Absolutely,
being a resident is a paid job
you don't pay for it, they will pay

I am afraid you are confusing residency with externships and some fellowships
yes, in these situations some programs may ask you for a fee but never in the range you mentioned.
 

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Teaching hospitals and accredited programs pay their residents via Medicare.

Medicare covers all the costs incurred of teaching the residents including stipends and fringe benefits of residents; salaries and fringe benefits of faculty who supervise the residents; other direct costs; and allocated institutional overhead costs, such as maintenance and electricity.

Everything is paid by Medicare.

The hospital will give you 40 to 50 thousands salary per year but in fact they take over 80 thousands directly from Medicare for each year you are a resident.

This has been there since the initiation of Medicare in the year 1965 and it's called Medicare Direct Graduate Medical Education (DGME) Payments, for more details refer to this page
http://www.aamc.org/advocacy/library/gme/gme0001.htm

I can absolutely understand your puzzle, how come a person coming from outside, get trained without paying a penny and even gets salary!

This issue has been discussed recently in the media, some conservative republicans are saying that J1 visa medical residents should not be allowed because they are basically using Medicare benefit and the federal law and the Constitution states that non-US individuals are not eligible for public benefits!

But it's more complex than that, because hospitals cannot survive without residents as they do most of the "junk work" and each year there are hundreds and thousands of J1 Visa residents. So it's extremely unlikely to stop issuing J1 visas in the foreseeable future.
 
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