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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
An animal is made diabetic by injection of a drug that destroys pancreatic beta cells. Removal of which of the following organs would most likely produce a decrease in blood glucose concentration in this animal?


A. Anterior pituitary
B. Colon
C. Gonads
D. Kidney
E. Pancreas
 

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is this question right? someone diabetic i would assume only needs some source of insulin to reduce blood glucose. removing an organ instead???:confused: this is a crazy question!!:rolleyes:

how bout if we remove the colon and then no more intake of glucose can further increase the glucose?:eek:
 

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An animal is made diabetic by injection of a drug that destroys pancreatic beta cells. Removal of which of the following organs would most likely produce a decrease in blood glucose concentration in this animal?

A. Anterior pituitary
B. Colon
C. Gonads
D. Kidney
E. Pancreas
answer is D?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The correct answer

actually ,it s from kaplan qbank
The correct answer is A. Two of the secretions of the anterior pituitary affect the sensitivity of peripheral tissues
to the action of insulin. Growth hormone has a direct effect on liver and muscle to decrease insulin sensitivity.
This may be partly through a growth hormone-induced decline in insulin receptors or to unknown post-receptor defects. In excess, growth hormone is "diabetogenic," and about 25% of patients with acromegaly have diabetes. ACTH indirectly has anti-insulin effects by virtue of the cortisol secretion it evokes. Like growth hormone, cortisol also decreases insulin sensitivity in peripheral tissues.
A third anterior pituitary hormone,TSH, also tends to increase blood glucose levels. In this case, the effect is probably mediated mostly through increased glucose absorption by the gut. Patients with hyperthyroidism can sometimes exhibit a postprandial glucosuria because of excessive intestinal glucose absorption. In diabetic animals, the removal of the anterior pituitary may lower blood glucose by increasing tissue sensitivity to whatever insulin remains
 

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Permissive action of cortisol

why not pancreas as it releases glucagon which function is to increase blood glucose
Glucagon alone can not stimulate production of PEPCK(phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase) rate limiting enzyme in Gluconeogenesis,rather it requires permissive action of cortisole for doing so....on the other hand cortisol and grothhormone can stimulate gluconeogenesis by their own...
so if we remove source of glucagon ; GH & Cortisol r still their to carry out gluconeogenesis..
but if we remove ant pituitary...glucagon is helpless...it can not produce PEPCK by it own....:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
why not pancreas as it releases glucagon which function is to increase blood glucose
As khushboo said it can t be pancreas cause not only glucagon can increase blood glucose ,what about GH & Cortisol ???
So ,pancreatectomy would make the hyperglycemia worse by removing the source of any remaining insulin
 
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