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Hi everyone,

I am currently reviewing Behavioral Science. One of the concepts I can't get around is "Aversion Conditioning". I understand how it works, but in almost all the sources, it's listed under "Behavioral therapies based on Classical Conditioning". Looking at the definition of "Operant Conditioning", it seems that Aversion Conditioning perfectly fits in this type of conditioning.

Operant (Instrumental) conditioning: Behavior is determined/emitted by consequence (reinforcement or punishment) that occurs immediately following that behavior

In aversion conditioning, we pair the unwanted behavior (e.g., drinking) with an aversive stimulus (e.g., early hangover) so that the patient would avoid that behavior.

If anyone could help me with that, I'd be very grateful.
Thanks in advance.
 

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Hi everyone,

I am currently reviewing Behavioral Science. One of the concepts I can't get around is "Aversion Conditioning". I understand how it works, but in almost all the sources, it's listed under "Behavioral therapies based on Classical Conditioning". Looking at the definition of "Operant Conditioning", it seems that Aversion Conditioning perfectly fits in this type of conditioning.

Operant (Instrumental) conditioning: Behavior is determined/emitted by consequence (reinforcement or punishment) that occurs immediately following that behavior

In aversion conditioning, we pair the unwanted behavior (e.g., drinking) with an aversive stimulus (e.g., early hangover) so that the patient would avoid that behavior.

If anyone could help me with that, I'd be very grateful.
Thanks in advance.
hey man, so in classical conditioning, a stimulus is provided before behavior occurs and in operant conditioning, a consequence is administered AFTER behavior occurs to increase to decrease likelihood of it happening again. now a positive consequence involves doing something, and a negative consequence involves stopping or withholding something. for example, you curse in school and your teacher kicks you out of the class. getting kicked out of class is a punishment, specifically positive punishment because the teacher did something (kicked student out of class). read my definitions above again in case this didnt make sense.
in classical conditioning, you pair an unconditioned stimulus with a conditioned stimulus and elicit an unconditioned response. over time an association develops and then the conditioned stimulus now alone creates a conditioned response. so a real life example of aversion conditioning is giving disulfiram to alcoholics, everytime they drink they feel sick. here, disulfiram is the unconditioned stimulus and feeling sick is the unconditioned response. alcohol is the conditioned stimulus. overtime they develop an association between the stimuli and now when they think drink alcohol on its own, they feel sick. this is classical conditioning. classical conditioning deals with involuntary responses. feeling sick is an involuntary response.
 

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Hi everyone,

I am currently reviewing Behavioral Science. One of the concepts I can't get around is "Aversion Conditioning". I understand how it works, but in almost all the sources, it's listed under "Behavioral therapies based on Classical Conditioning". Looking at the definition of "Operant Conditioning", it seems that Aversion Conditioning perfectly fits in this type of conditioning.

Operant (Instrumental) conditioning: Behavior is determined/emitted by consequence (reinforcement or punishment) that occurs immediately following that behavior

In aversion conditioning, we pair the unwanted behavior (e.g., drinking) with an aversive stimulus (e.g., early hangover) so that the patient would avoid that behavior.

If anyone could help me with that, I'd be very grateful.
Thanks in advance.
Operant conditioning : You push a button ----> you get a chocolate. Makes you want to push the button again ----> more chocolate. (something given to get a response)

Mum keeps telling kid to clean room(nagging) ----> kid cleans ---> she stops nagging (something taken away to get a response)

Now, classic conditioning, you don't give or take away anything.
Guy drinks (when on disulfiram)----> get the worst hangover ever ----> whenever he sees/smells alcohol = gets sick/nausea [AVERSION] <- this is a type of classical conditioning, when the response comes on its own.
 
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