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Can somebody please explain the mechanism behind breastfeeding jaundice, where usually a first-time mother is not so good at providing optimum breastfeeding to a newborn, and he/she gets jaundice on the 2nd-4th day. [don't confuse this with breastmilk jaundice, a different condition].

Is it direct or indirect? and why does it occur?
 

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I think your description of "not enough feeding" is dead on. I conceptualize it almost as dehydration. I found the following:

Breastfeeding failure jaundice typically occurs within the first week of life as lactation failure leads to inadequate intake with significant weight and fluid loss resulting in hypovolemia. This causes hyperbilirubinemia (jaundice) and in some cases, hypernatremia defined as a serum sodium >150 mEq/L. Decreased intake also causes slower bilirubin elimination and increased enterohepatic circulation that contribute to elevated total bilirubin.

I wasn't able to find if it is conjugated or unconjugated.
 

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Can somebody please explain the mechanism behind breastfeeding jaundice, where usually a first-time mother is not so good at providing optimum breastfeeding to a newborn, and he/she gets jaundice on the 2nd-4th day. [don't confuse this with breastmilk jaundice, a different condition].

Is it direct or indirect? and why does it occur?
Breast feeding jaundice is an exaggeration of physiologic jaundice due to increased enterohepatic circulation and so it is Unconjugated bilirubin that is rising.

Breast milk jaundice also presents in the first week and it also has Unconjuated bilirubin BUT the infant would be thriving well with enough wet diapers!
 
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