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The combination of these three clinical features is a classical presentation of a patient with Glucagonoma.
It's tumor of the alpha cells of the pancreas that produces Glucagon.
Although this tumor is one of the rarist tumors of mankind it's still asked by the USMLE because it implies understanding of the glucagon physiology.
The diabetes is usually mild, the anemia is due to the catabolic action of glucagon, and the dermatitis is characteristically described as Migratory Necrolytic Dermatitis.
Diagnosis is made by elevated glucagon blood level and the tumor is confirmed by CT scan.
Surgery is curative.
 

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The combination of these three clinical features is a classical presentation of a patient with Glucagonoma.
It's tumor of the alpha cells of the pancreas that produces Glucagon.
Although this tumor is one of the rarist tumors of mankind it's still asked by the USMLE because it implies understanding of the glucagon physiology.
The diabetes is usually mild, the anemia is due to the catabolic action of glucagon, and the dermatitis is characteristically described as Migratory Necrolytic Dermatitis.
Diagnosis is made by elevated glucagon blood level and the tumor is confirmed by CT scan.
Surgery is curative.
That's absolutely correct, but I think you should've made it clear that the diabetes was type 2, and also that the dermatitis was migratory;
the reason for that being that one could assume this triad to be type 1 DM, dermatitis herpetiformis, and anemia secondary to celiac.
 
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