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A 65 year old smoker with a three month history of a dry cough develops bilateral pleural effusions. Thoracocentesis reveals a pleural effusion with a Lactic Acid Dehydrogenase level which is is less than 50% of the serum Lactic Acid Dehydrogenase level.
This suggests that:

A- Patient is probably a diabetic
B- Protein content of the fluid is mostly less than 4 g/dl
C- Bronchogenic carcinoma
D- The specific gravity of the fluid is likely less than 1.02
E- Patient developed empyema
 

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A 65 year old smoker with a three month history of a dry cough develops bilateral pleural effusions. Thoracocentesis reveals a pleural effusion with a Lactic Acid Dehydrogenase level which is is less than 50% of the serum Lactic Acid Dehydrogenase level.
This suggests that:

A- Patient is probably a diabetic
B- Protein content of the fluid is mostly less than 4 g/dl
C- Bronchogenic carcinoma
D- The specific gravity of the fluid is likely less than 1.02
E- Patient developed empyema
I think it's E.
Becoz Measuring LDH in fluid aspirated from a pleural effusion (or pericardial effusion) can help in the distinction between exudates (actively secreted fluid, e.g. due to inflammation) or transudates (passively secreted fluid, due to a high hydrostatic pressure or a low oncotic pressure). LDH is elevated (>200 U/l) in an exudate and low in a transudate. In empyema, the LDH levels generally will exceed 1000 U/l.
Ref:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lactate_dehydrogenase
 
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