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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey

I have a question
We know that Spanish is a common language in the states, is it considered an advantage in applying for residency ?

Thanks anyway :)
 

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Oh yes it helps

Oh yes, it matters big time.

Spanish language is an advantage when you apply to any job not only medical residency.

Many US physicians find themselves forced to learn Spanish in order to serve their patients. They at least take Medical Spanish courses or carry a small book.

Are you planning to learn Spanish :confused:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Many thanks ... you've been really helpful :)

and yes, I am planning to start Spanish sessions as soon as I finish my step 1 exam , so I hope it'll be useful as u said
 

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Percentage of Spanish speaking people in the States

Spanish speaking is a big plus. PDs of programs which are in Spanish-speaking areas will prefer you on other applicants if you have a competitive CV in addition. This is a sample of the top Spanish-speaking states, you can Google about the cities in each state to know which programs are in the Spanish-speaking areas.

  1. New Mexico 43.27%
  2. California 34.72%
  3. Texas 34.63%
  4. Arizona 28.03%
  5. Nevada 22.80%
  6. Colorado 19.10%
  7. Florida 19.01%
  8. New York 15.96%
  9. New Jersey 14.90%
  10. Illinois 13.94%
  11. Connecticut 10.63%
  12. Utah 10.45%
  13. Rhode Island 10.35%
  14. Oregon 9.56%
  15. Idaho 8.88%
  16. District of Columbia 8.53%
  17. Washington 8.48%
  18. Kansas 8.06%
Goodluck
 

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Hey

I have a question
We know that Spanish is a common language in the states, is it considered an advantage in applying for residency ?

Thanks anyway :)
depends where are u living, in Texas or Louisiana yes u should know and also what are your scores if its 90+ on both times I don't think so that you need Spanish :)) as Spanish patients are interpreted by nurses or telephone translators.
 

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I personally think that understanding spanish and try to speak at least a little bit is important, is not only in Texas or Louisiana. Where did you get that from. Have you ever been in Florida, New Jersey, California, New York,...... Many states have a lot of latin people. My brother in law did his residency in New York and he was the only resident that speaks spanish, it help him alot, he was the translator. Every single resident depend on him to translate to all those spanish spoken patients.
So yes I personally believe is important to get at least familiar with the language.
 

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I personally think that understanding spanish and try to speak at least a little bit is important, is not only in Texas or Louisiana. Where did you get that from. Have you ever been in Florida, New Jersey, California, New York,...... Many states have a lot of latin people. My brother in law did his residency in New York and he was the only resident that speaks spanish, it help him alot, he was the translator. Every single resident depend on him to translate to all those spanish spoken patients.
So yes I personally believe is important to get at least familiar with the language.
Check the stats in the above post
 

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Our intensive Spanish courses are designed for people who want to learn Spanish quickly or in a short period of time. Speak Spanish from the day one.
 

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Yes, a little. Language skills are helpful, with Spanish being the most important one.

In the context of Step scores, publications, clinical experience in the U.S. - the ability to speak Spanish ranks much much lower. The annual Program Director's survey from the NRMP will show this. Your ability to interview well, in English, is also going to determine your match position.

If speaking Spanish is one thing that is very important to you, then I would recommend including this in your personal statement. Explain how you learned, why it was challenging and how you use Spanish to improve the care of your patients during medical school. This will help frame your language skills with more weight.
--
Steve @ www.residencyinterviewquestions.com
 

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Interesting post

I started learning spanish and it took me over a year to get to basic level. I am now focusing on medical vocabulary. Is there someone in the same boat, we can discuss/quiz each other from time to time.
I am very happy that it will boost my application, I have already put in hundreds of hours doing that. So I guess it is all worth it!
 

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I started learning spanish and it took me over a year to get to basic level. I am now focusing on medical vocabulary. Is there someone in the same boat, we can discuss/quiz each other from time to time.
I am very happy that it will boost my application, I have already put in hundreds of hours doing that. So I guess it is all worth it!
That's really cool, I learned a little bit of Spanish also, we can discuss together and practice if you are interested..
 
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