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So here's the deal. I'm currently a junior at a highly ranked undergraduate university, and I have had aspirations to becoming a doctor since I was in high school.

This last semester I started to doubt my decision to go to medical school a little bit. After taking biology, I noticed I hated memorizing, which I hear is what a lot of medical school is composed of. I prefer more problem solving type of learning, such as the type you do in physics or math. In addition, I am not sure if it is worth both the time and money investment (4 years med school, about 4 years residency). I would like to have SOME sort of life during my 20's, i.e. continue running at somewhat of a competitive level and have some sort of social life. But from what I have heard med school students and residents are completely consumed by their work and career, to the point that they have very little social life or time to focus on anything but medicine.
 

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Hi there. What you've heard is correct, there is a lot of memorizing and medical school will dominate a lot of your time. Some people manage to continue their sports but it is not common to hear about people competing in sports. Your social life with your friends outside of med school will likely suffer. I'm in my mid-20s and it's sad but literally my entire 20s will have been in undergrad, med school, and residency. Obviously I'm not the social butterfly I once was because I simply don't have the time or energy. However, there are some people who manage to continue going out and live life, and some med schools where the demands aren't so high. Go to med school if you are willing to do whatever it takes to be a doctor. If you go to med school on a whim or you can see yourself doing something else then I'd say do something else. This process is arduous and I would only recommend it to someone who felt that they HAVE to be a doctor bc they really can't see themselves doing anything else and would be miserable doing anything else. Because even once you're done with your training, being a doctor is still hard, time consuming, and not necessarily going to make you well-off especially if you graduate with a lot of debt. But if you really want to do it, it will be worth it in the end, in spite of all the things you sacrifice along the way. Do it for the right reasons and you'll be happy. Follow your gut.
 
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