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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Over a five week period, a previously healthy 55 year old women has developed headaches progressively severe word- finding difficulty and confusion. She speaks incoherently and is unable to follow commands repeat phrases or name object . What is most likely site of lesion (lobe of brain) and type of aphasia?

(I am sure you guys have already done this question but here I am unable to differentiate btw receptive and conduction aphasia????:notsure:
 

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She has global aphasia, both broca's and wernickes areas are affected.
Lesion of superior temporal gyrus (left MCA lesion)
 

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i hope the pt is suffering from global aphasia not receptive or conductive

expressive aphasia/broca's aphasia/nonfluent aphasia
-- lesion to inf. frontal gyrus...broca's area....motor area for speech...incoherence in speech,word finding difficulty,repetition lost all are associated with broca's aphasia but they can follow commands...fluency will be lost with intact comprehension...

receptive/wernicke's/fluent aphasia
---supratemporal gyrus-----it is kinda sensory area for speech......center for comprehension,which will be lost in this lesion.....but fluency is present with many new words(neologism) including in their sentences..pts generally unaware of their condition,unable to follow verbal commands...repetition is lost too.

conductive aphasia----lesion to arcuate fasciculus....connect sensory with motor( wernicke with broca)......center for repetition...so repetition is lost remaining all intact....
as broca and wernicke are in contact with arcuate fasciculus...repetition is lost in them too......

global aphasia----is lesion involving all the 3 areas

as for the question....i guess headaches associated mostly with wernicke's but symptoms are alike broca's..........
anyways...correct me if am wrong
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
(Thanks guys for your reply but now i am posting options as well so that you can connect pathology with site of lesion )

Over a five week period, a previously healthy 55 year old women has developed headaches progressively severe word- finding difficulty and confusion. She speaks incoherently and is unable to follow commands repeat phrases or name object . What is most likely site of lesion?

A frontal lobe
B temporal lobe
C Occipital lobe
D parietal lobe
E Cerebellum
 

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(Thanks guys for your reply but now i am posting options as well so that you can connect pathology with site of lesion )

Over a five week period, a previously healthy 55 year old women has developed headaches progressively severe word- finding difficulty and confusion. She speaks incoherently and is unable to follow commands repeat phrases or name object . What is most likely site of lesion?

A frontal lobe
B temporal lobe
C Occipital lobe
D parietal lobe
E Cerebellum
My diagnosis was global aphasia from sup.temporal lesion
My answer is Bb
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Global aphasia is a type of aphasia that is commonly associated with a large lesion in the perisylvian area of the frontal, temporal and parietal lobes of the brain causing an almost total reduction of all aspects of spoken and written language.[1] It involves a "left side blowout" which includes Broca's area, Wernicke's area and the Arcuate fasciculus.
(source wiki)

then why not parietal or frontal lobe?
 

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(Thanks guys for your reply but now i am posting options as well so that you can connect pathology with site of lesion )

Over a five week period, a previously healthy 55 year old women has developed headaches progressively severe word- finding difficulty and confusion. She speaks incoherently and is unable to follow commands repeat phrases or name object . What is most likely site of lesion?

A frontal lobe
B temporal lobe
C Occipital lobe
D parietal lobe
E Cerebellum
weird options , brocas area is present in frontal lobe and wrnks in temporal, definitely patient has issues with both... may be am missing something, is there any explanation given with the answer??? :confused:
 

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weird options , brocas area is present in frontal lobe and wrnks in temporal, definitely patient has issues with both... may be am missing something, is there any explanation given with the answer??? :confused:
yes indeed, i'm stuck between frontal and temporal too....global aphasia with varied symptoms...but, i would like to go with temporal ( since migraine headaches are common with it)....but, i'm not sure though.....waiting for answr
 

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Global aphasia is a type of aphasia that is commonly associated with a large lesion in the perisylvian area of the frontal, temporal and parietal lobes of the brain causing an almost total reduction of all aspects of spoken and written language.[1] It involves a "left side blowout" which includes Broca's area, Wernicke's area and the Arcuate fasciculus.
(source wiki)

then why not parietal or frontal lobe?


Broca's aphasia....inferior frontal gyrus lesion
Wernickes aphasia.....Superior temporal gyrus lesion
Globa aphasia........Sup temporal gyrus lesion
Conduction aphasia.....Arcuate fasciculus lesion

Guys we are not neurologists:eek:once we can diagnose the aphasia the pxt has in the exam,we should just match it with site of lesion:eek:I will learn the rest in residency:))
 
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link

Over a five week period, a previously healthy 55 year old women has developed headaches progressively severe word- finding difficulty and confusion. She speaks incoherently and is unable to follow commands repeat phrases or name object . What is most likely site of lesion (lobe of brain) and type of aphasia?

(I am sure you guys have already done this question but here I am unable to differentiate btw receptive and conduction aphasia????:notsure:
Here's a link to diff types of aphasia
http://blogs.umass.edu/aphasia/for-professionalsstudents/aphasia-types/
 
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