Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Exotoxin and ADP ribosylation - USMLE Forums
USMLE Forums Logo
USMLE Forums         Your Reliable USMLE Online Community     Members     Posts
Home
USMLE Articles
USMLE News
USMLE Polls
USMLE Books
USMLE Apps
Go Back   USMLE Forums > USMLE Step 1 Forum

USMLE Step 1 Forum USMLE Step 1 Discussion Forum: Let's talk about anything related to USMLE Step 1 exam


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 12-04-2010
USMLE Forums Guru
 
Steps History: 1 + CS
Posts: 438
Threads: 111
Thanked 241 Times in 138 Posts
Reputation: 251
Bacteria Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Exotoxin and ADP ribosylation

Pseudomona Aeruginosa Exotoxin A inactivates EF-2.
Does it does this by ADP ribosylation like Corynebacterium diphtheriae???????
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message



  #2  
Old 12-04-2010
USMLE Forums Master
 
Steps History: 1+CK+CS+3
Posts: 741
Threads: 137
Thanked 2,573 Times in 446 Posts
Reputation: 2676
Default Yes.

Yes diphtheria, pertussis, cholera, and pseudomonas they all have extotoxin that work by ADP ribosylation.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
The above post was thanked by:
aktorque (12-04-2010), evavar (12-04-2010)
  #3  
Old 12-04-2010
USMLE Forums Guru
 
Steps History: Step 1 Only
Posts: 487
Threads: 95
Thanked 1,500 Times in 361 Posts
Reputation: 1510
Arrow Little more info

Cholera toxin ADP-ribosylates G proteins, causing massive fluid secretion from the lining of the small intestine, resulting in life-threatening diarrhea.

P. aeruginosa ADP-ribosylates cytoskeleton and GTP-binding proteins.

Diphtheria toxin - It catalyzes the ADP-ribosylation of eukaryotic elongation factor-2 (eEF2), inactivating this protein.

Pertussis toxin - PT catalyzes the ADP-ribosylation of the α subunits of the heterotrimeric G proteins Gi, Go, and Gt. This prevents the G proteins from interacting with G protein-coupled receptors on the cell membrane, thus interfering with intracellular communication. The Gi subunits remain locked in their GDP-bound, inactive state, thus unable to inhibit adenyl cyclase activity, leading to increased cellular concentrations of cAMP.

Increased intracellular cAMP affects normal biological signaling. The toxin causes several systemic effects, among which is an increased release of insulin, causing hypoglycemia. Whether the effects of pertussis toxin are responsible for the paroxysmal cough remains unknown.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
The above post was thanked by:
JaJeeK (12-04-2010), Pixie (12-04-2010), rasheed (12-04-2010)



Reply

Tags
Microbiology-

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the USMLE Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:
Medical School
Choose "---" if you don't want to tell. AMG for US & Canadian medical schools. IMG for all other medical schools.
USMLE Steps History
What steps finished! Example: 1+CK+CS+3 = Passed Step 1, Step 2 CK, Step 2 CS, and Step 3.

Choose "---" if you don't want to tell.

Favorite USMLE Books
What USMLE books you really think are useful. Leave blank if you don't want to tell.
Location
Where you live. Leave blank if you don't want to tell.

Log-in


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes


Find Us on Facebook
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

USMLE® & other trade marks belong to their respective owners, read full disclaimer
USMLE Forums created under Creative Commons 3.0 License. (2009-2019)